Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107
Home |
Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/assignments.php on line 46

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/nonumberelements/helpers/parameters.php on line 107

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 421

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 426

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 394

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 401

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 421

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 421

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 426

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 386

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/plugins/system/advancedmodules/modulehelper.php on line 389
FREE GEAR Every Week!!
Name:
Email:
(Winners will be drawn at random)
Free Ebook with sign up!
Free Ebook
"The Anatomy of
the Acoustic Guitar"

COMING SOON!
COMING SOON!
COMING SOON!
      

BLOG UPDATE: "5 Steps to Increase Stage Fright!!"

Most Popular

Rogue RM-100A A-Style Mandolin Sunburst

Rogue RM-100A A-Style Mandolin Sunburst

Sporting a gorgeous finish, the Rogue RM-100A is a well-built, traditional A-model mandolin. It features clean workmanship throughout and projects a bright tone with lots of bark. With an easy-to-play neck and adjustable bridge, the RM-100A is perfect for beginners who wish to play bluegrass or any other style of music. Finishing touches include chrome tuners and nickel-plated frets.


Ibanez A-Style Acoustic Electric Mandolin Dark Violin Sunburst

Ibanez A-Style Acoustic Electric Mandolin Dark Violin Sunburst

Ibanez has a storied history in bluegrass and acoustic music. Even Bill Monroe explored the Ibanez line of mandolins way back in the 1970s. Once you hear these little 8-strings, it's not surprising why. Designed under the premiere craftsmanship of Ibanez luthiers and using fine tonewoods, this Ibanez mandolin sounds great and will stand the test of time, without a high pricetag. Built in the teardrop A-style platform, the M510EDVS features mahogany for the neck, back and sides, offering a crisp attack and lasting high-end sustain—ideal for chopping away in the rhythm or for shimmering solos.


Kentucky KM-150S Standard A-model All-solid Mandolin Traditional Sunburst

Kentucky KM-150S Standard A-model All-solid Mandolin Traditional Sunburst

All-solid tone wood construction means that the Kentucky KM-150 mandolin will just get better and better right along with you. As moisture and resins dissipate over time, the solid spruce top will vibrate ever more freely as tone and volume increase. Take pleasure in growing with your instrument.The deeper bodied KM-150 is ideal for Bluegrass, Old-Time, Gospel and the Country and has all of the design features that have defined the A-Model Mandolins for over 80 years.


Starter's Kit


Fender FM 100 Mandolin Pack Sunburst

Fender FM 100 Mandolin Pack Sunburst

A-style slim-line design mandolin with a laminated spruce top, laminated nato back and sides, nato neck with 13.7" scale length, rosewood fingerboard, and compensated height-adjustable rosewood bridge. 4 chrome in-line machine heads with white plastic buttons. Other special touches include dot inlays, simple black/white body binding, silkscreened logo, white plastic nut and saddle, 2-ply black pickguard, 4-ply ivory body binding, bound fingerboard, chrome tailpiece, and F holes. Includes gig bag, strap, strings, chromatic tuner, picks, and instructional material.


Wiki

wikipedia iconWIKIPEDIA:  MANDOLIN

A mandolin is a musical instrument in the lute family (plucked, or strummed). It descends from the mandore, a soprano member of the lute family. The mandolin soundboard (the top) comes in many shapes—but generally round or teardrop-shaped, sometimes with scrolls or other projections. A mandolin may have f-holes, or a single round or oval sound hole. A round or oval sound hole may be bordered with decorative rosettes or purfling, but usually doesn't feature an intricately carved grille like a Baroque era mandolin.

Early mandolins had six double courses of gut strings, tuned similarly to lutes, and plucked with the fingertips. Modern mandolins—which originated in Naples, Italy in the 3rd quarter of the 18th century—commonly have four double courses (four pairs) of metal strings, which are plucked with a plectrum.

Many variants of the mandolin have existed. These include Milanese, Lombard, Brescian and other 6-course types, as well as four-string (one string per course), twelve-string (three strings per course), and sixteen-string (four strings per course).


CONSTRUCTION

mandolinA mandolin's typically hollow wooden body has a neck with a flat (or slight radius) fretted fingerboard, a nut and floating bridge, a tailpiece or pinblock at the edge of the face to which the strings are attached, and mechanical tuning machines, rather than friction pegs, to accommodate metal strings. Like any plucked instrument, mandolin notes decay to silence rather than sound out continuously as with a bowed note on a violin. Its small size and higher pitch make mandolin notes decay faster than larger stringed instruments like guitar, which encourages the use of tremolo (rapid picking of one or more pairs of strings) to create sustained notes or chords. The mandolin's paired strings facilitate this technique: the plectrum (pick) strikes each of a pair of strings alternately, providing a more full and continuous sound than a single string would.

Various design variations and amplification techniques have been used to make mandolins compatible in volume with louder instruments and orchestras. Hybridization with the louder banjo creates the mandolin-banjo, and resonators have been used, most notably by Dobro and the National String Instrument Corporation. Some musicians play electric mandolins through amplifiers.


FORMS

Mandolins come in several forms. The Neapolitan style, known as a round-back or bowl-back (or "tater-bug", colloquial American) has a vaulted back made of a number of strips of wood in a bowl formation, similar to a lute, and usually a canted, two-plane, uncarved top. Another form has a banjo-style body.

At the very end of the nineteenth century, a new style, with a carved top and back construction inspired by violin family instruments began to supplant the European-style bowl-back instruments, especially in the United States. This new style is credited to mandolins designed and built by Orville Gibson, a Kalamazoo, Michigan luthier who founded the "Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Co., Limited" in 1902. Gibson mandolins evolved into two basic styles: the Florentine or F-style, which has a decorative scroll near the neck, two points on the lower body, and usually a scroll carved into the headstock; and the A-style, which is pear shaped, has no points, and usually has a simpler headstock.

These styles generally have either two f-shaped soundholes like a violin (F-5 and A-5), or an oval sound hole (F-4 and A-4 and lower models) directly under the strings. Much variation exists between makers working from these archetypes, and other variants have become increasingly common. The Gibson F-hole F-5-style mandolins have come to be considered the most typical and traditional for playing American bluegrass music, while the A-style is generally more associated with Irish, folk, or classical music. The more complicated woodwork also translates into a more expensive instrument.

Internal bracing to support the top in the F-style mandolins was usually achieved with parallel tone bars, similar to the bass bar on a violin. Some makers instead employ "x-bracing", which is two tone bars mortised together to form an X. Some luthiers now using a "modified x-bracing", which incorporates both a tone bar and x-bracing.

Numerous modern mandolin makers build instruments that largely replicate the Gibson F-5 Artist models built in the early 1920s under the supervision of Gibson acoustician Lloyd Loar. Original Loar-signed instruments are sought after and extremely valuable.

Other American-made variants include the mandolinetto or Howe-Orme guitar-shaped mandolin (manufactured by the Elias Howe Company between 1897 and roughly 1920), which featured a cylindrical bulge along the top from fingerboard end to tailpiece; the Army-Navy style with a flat back and top; and the Vega mando-lute (more commonly called a cylinder-back mandolin manufactured by the Vega Company between 1913 and roughly 1927), which had a similar longitudinal bulge but on the back rather than the front of the instrument.

As with almost every other contemporary string instrument, another modern variant is the electric mandolin. These mandolins can have four (single), five (single) or eight (double) strings.


TUNING

A variety of different tunings are used. Usually, courses of 2 adjacent strings are doubled (tuned to the same pitch). The most common tuning by far (GDAE), is the same as violin tuning:

  • fourth (lowest tone) course: G3 (196.00 Hz)
  • third course: D4 (293.66 Hz)
  • second course: A4 (440.00 Hz; A above middle C)
  • first (highest tone) course: E5 (659.25 Hz)

Mandolin fretboard.png

Other tunings exist, including "cross-tunings", in which the usually doubled string runs are tuned to different pitches. Additionally, guitarists may sometimes tune a mandolin to mimic a portion of the intervals on a standard guitar tuning to achieve familiar fretting patterns.

(Wikipedia.com, "Mandolin", Link to article)


New FAQs


Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/mdean/public_html/modules/mod_quickfaq/helper.php on line 122
Strum Strings

Featured Videos

Raw Talent!!

Is this a camera trick?